Movies locations – Vignamaggio

Kenneth Branagh chose Vignamaggio, in Tuscany, as the setting for his 1993 adaptation of the theatrical comedy “Much ado about nothing”.

Vignamaggio is in the geographical and enological heart of the Chianti Classico region, half way between Florence and Siena.

The estate was already famous as the birthplace of Mona Lisa in 1479.

Villa Vignamaggio
Much ado about nothing – the cast

Sigh no more, ladies

Sigh No More” is a song by William Shakespeare.

In the movie Much ado about nothing, Emma Thompson recites this poem while eating grapes on a picnic. The film is really cheerful and the characters are young and smart.

Emma Thompson – Much ado about nothing

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more.

Men were deceivers ever,

One foot in sea, and one on shore,

To one thing constant never.

Then sigh not so, but let them go,

And be you blithe and bonny,

Converting all your sounds of woe

Into hey nonny, nonny.

Much ado about nothing (1993)

Much ado about nothing

Much ado about nothing is a romantic comedy film based on the play written by William Shakespeare in 1599. The plot is reduced to a minimum in favour of the verbal delight.

In a lovely and sun drenched setting in Italy, Kenneth Branagh directs the movie and play the role of Benedick, opposite Beatrice played by Emma Thompson, his real wife at that time. In the movie they are involved in a love tussle that amuses the audience.

Much ado about nothing is definitely a well-made comedy, full of witty jokes and magnificent eloquence, the actors are young and beautiful and yet there’s something in it that I don’t like. Maybe Branagh? I can’t deny that I have a strong dislike for him since he cheated on Emma.

It’s weird but I can’t stand movies in which the two act together.

Nonetheless I must admit that it is a good film.

Emma is hilarious and teasing, she is very confident and comfortable in her role and her mother is in the cast as Ursula.

Much ado about nothing – Pic nic scene

Then sigh not so, but let them go,

And be you blithe and bonny,

Converting all your sounds of woe

Into hey nonny, nonny.